Which alloy is the hardest? Hardness test of 10 metals

I'm going to test all alloys which I cast during the last 2 years. I will use a hardness tester to find out which metal is the hardest. There is a list of metals (alloys) which I'm going to test:
1. German silver;
2. Tin Bronze;
3. Manganese Bronze;
4. Aluminum Bronze;
5. Brass;
6. Copper;
7. Aluminum;
8. Lead;
9. Red Brass;
10. Steel

Making red Brass or Bronze or Gunmetal. Have you ever seen red brass?

Red brass is a copper-zinc-tin alloy known as gunmetal. This alloy is considered both brass and bronze. I'm going to use 85% - copper, 5% - zinc, 5% - lead and 5% - tin. Red brass is one of the most durable metals for the plumbing industry and commercial water pipe applications. It has a grate resistance to sanitizing. Red brass is also specified for underground service lines since it offers great corrosion resistance to all types of potable waters, and has moderate strength and good retention of spring properties.

German SIlver from coins. Melting Nickel Silver and casting bars

For my future projects I'm going to try melting metal which is very similar to silver. This is "German silver" or "nickel silver".

Nickel silver, Maillechort, German silver, Argentan, new silver, nickel brass, albata, alpacca is a copper alloy with nickel and often zinc. The usual formulation is 60% copper, 20% nickel and 20% zinc. Nickel silver is named due to its silvery appearance, but it contains no elemental silver unless plated. The name "German silver" refers to its development by 19th-century German metalworkers from the Chinese alloy known as paktong (白銅) (cupronickel). All modern, commercially important nickel silvers (such as those standardized under ASTM B122) contain significant amounts of zinc, and are sometimes considered a subset of brass.
Article from Wikipedia: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nickel_silver

3 Metals Casting - Unique Plaques (Brass, Copper and Aluminum)

In this video I'll show 3 metals casting. Brass, copper and aluminum plaques will be made. It is combination of most interesting parts of my past videos.

Trident coat of arms. Brass casting. Independence Day of Ukraine!

Today I'll make a coat of arms - The Trident. Why? Because it's a special day - the Independence Day of Ukraine! To make this plaque I need approx 2.5 kg of brass. I had to try 2 casting methods. The first is casting into the open mold and the second is pouring into the close mold.

Cast Brass Door Number. Lost foam casting

The plastic door number on my flat door was damaged, so I decided to make a new one. As a material, I could use aluminum, brass or copper. I decided to make it of brass using lost foam casting technology.

Making a Cast Brass Belt Buckle

I wanted to make a new buckle for a belt. As a material, I decided to use brass. Steel cans filled with green sand were my molds.
The thinnest part of the original belt buckle was 2 mm and that was a real problem. From the first attempt, the casting was good except this thin part. I made it only on my third attempt.

Plaster mold casting has gone wrong. Got 3.6 kg brass plate

To make several parts for a knife handle I’ve made a plaster mold. The only problem was that I forgot to fix the upper part of the mold. When I started pouring the brass, molten metal lifted the upper part, and it started floating on the surface. Finally, I’ve got square heavy plate instead of several small and light parts. The final weight of the plate and the ingot was more than 3.6 kg (6.6 lbs).

Ancient money - Kievan Grivna. Casting brass ingot

In the Middle Ages in the Eastern European state which called Kievan Rus (Kyivska Rus), in which a very interesting money and in the same time, the measure of weight existed. This ancient money was called Kievan Grivna (hryvnia).

You can watch the whole process in the video above or read step by step instruction on this link on instructables.com: Ancient money - Kievan Grivna. Casting brass ingot

Melting used Shotgun Primers. Brass + Copper Casting

This time I’ve decided to melt some brass and copper scrap but not a simple alloy scrap. I prepared used shotgun primers. There are 2 types of fulminate caps: one made of brass and the second made of copper.

You can watch the whole process in the video above or read step by step instruction on this link on instructables.com: Melting used Shotgun Primers. Brass + Copper Casting

Brass casting - got nice ingot

In this video I'd like to show how I casted 614 gram (1 lb. 5 oz.) round brass ingot. For many people who start melting and casting metals, it can be hard to melt brass, bronze, copper after for example, lead and aluminum. The main problem is high brass melting point.

That’s why I had to upgrade my blowpipe before melting and casting brass. It was a real challenge to exceed 900 °С (1652 °F).

You can watch the whole process in the video above or read step by step instruction on this link on instructables.com: Brass casting - got nice ingot

Melting aluminum and brass differences

I'd like to share my ideas about differences in melting aluminum and brass using charcoal. First of all, I want to mention that it was enough easy to melt aluminium from the first attempt but the situation was totally different with brass. The hardest thing is the temperature. We should remember that if for aluminum we need to get 660 °С (1220 °F), for brass we need to exceed 900 °С (1652°F). That means brass demands +250-300 °С (482-572 °F).

You can watch the whole process in the video above or read step by step instruction on this link on instructables.com: Melting aluminum and brass differences

Brass casting - Heavy Paperweight

This time I've decided to make a brass paperweight. For this purpose I had to prepare a lot of brass scrap. As scrap brass I used old taps and other sanitaryware items. In addition, I prepared green sand. I had to find something which could be the pattern for the paperweight base and I found nice piece of square steel sheet. In fact melting and casting process consisted of 2 part. The first was making a base and the second a handle.

You can watch the whole process in the video above or read step by step instruction on this link on instructables.com: Brass casting - Heavy Paperweight